Moral support to State Govt

Editor,

The second wave of the Coronavirus continues to hit our country with a vengeance with lakhs of people being affected and thousands dying every day. Just a few days back I got a phone call from Germany asking me about the situation in India. Today the whole world knows that India is suffering at this time and so every Indian is responsible to fight this virus by being responsible citizens. Unfortunately even as the situation in the whole country worsens there are a few individuals who are not responsible for the safety of people in our own State. It is very sad to know that few people gave wrong numbers and addresses as they entered the state through Umling check point. Perhaps, this is not the time to play around and endanger the health of the people. In general, our State is safer compared to other states in India and it is the responsibility of every Meghalayan to fight against the virus and not only the State Government. Certainly, there have been failures from the State Health Department in handling this virus and I was also one of the victims last year. However, in my opinion let us not nurture our hatred and anger towards the Government but let us put up a united fight to eradicate this virus. At present our State is still much safer than others and it needs our cooperation before it becomes worse as seen in many parts of our country.

Yours etc.,

Aiborlang Nongsiej,

Mawkyrwat – 14

Perplexing MCS Result

Editor,

Through your esteemed daily, we would like to point out some inconsistencies in the recently declared MCS exams declared on April 29. MCS qualified at Rank 15 was working as an LDA in the office of the MPSC before the MCS recruitment advertisement, during and till date. She was selected for the post of Assistant Lecturer through MPSC but didn’t join for reasons that are now crystal clear. We are sure that she was privy to all confidential affairs relating to MCS recruitment since she’s an LDA in that office. Getting undue advantage of all information  relating to MCS exam is a no brainer. We can only hope that besides being in the loop of things, no favouritism or influence has propelled her to clear her MCS exam although that is highly doubtful!

Then MPSC has forgotten that in this very year the results for the LDA exams were declared on March 3, 2021, for which candidates at Rank no 66 and 68 clearly featured at the bottom half of the comparatively much easier LDA exams. But these two fellows magically appeared in the top 10 position for the MCS at Rank 3 and 8 respectively. Do we need to scratch our heads here? Are we missing something? Yesterday someone had written in these columns that this was the time for the MPSC to redeem its lost credibility but many of us doubt if that will ever happen unless the Commission becomes completely independent, in that no political appointees should be allowed. Will some public spirited citizens go to Court on this issue? If not the Meghalaya Government will continue to get the worst by weeding out the best to serve the state. Why do we wonder why there is so much corruption and poor governance in Meghalaya!

Yours etc.,

Name withheld on request,

Via email

Culture: A victim or saviour

Editor,

Culture is undoubtedly very dear to us all. Even the ones who outrightly go against societal preferences seem to be innately proud of their culture, for culture is a proof of civilization and who does not want to be termed ‘civilized’?  But unlike most civilisations that flourish and stand as examples, others shrink and fade with time. Very often calamities, both natural and human induced have been attributed to such shrinkage and the eventual collapse of civilizations. However, the loss of culture is not as sudden as a calamity. It is instead the aversion of individuals to accept the culture, love it, live it and most importantly, share it. Civilization which have shared their culture have bought themselves longevity. The primary reasons for a thriving culture are acceptance  and sharing. The English and Japanese are outstanding examples of those who have accepted the changes to and shared the aspects of their culture.

The Constitution of India under the 5th, 6th and 10th Schedules provides various ways and means to safeguard the socio-economic interests of various communities in India. While the safeguards are very essential for the politico-economic upliftment and protection of ‘unique cultures’ in India, more pro-active measures must be undertaken first at the regional and then at national level for the growth and spread of such unique cultures.  At the regional level, language and culture sharing between various communities of the state must be encouraged. What is also needed is an attitudinal change among the tribal and non-tribal households. The perception of “their ways” and “my ways” has to change to “our ways”. Fact remains that despite having lived in the state for generations now, only a few non-tribal locals make an attempt to learn the tribal ways (language, for example), which is also, most often fuelled by economic needs. On the other hand, the “son of the soil” attitude displayed by some tribals contravenes the sharing and contributes to shrinking of the culture.

One who truly loves and wants their culture to flourish must embrace the changes that time brings with it while also encouraging others to embrace aspects of their culture. It must also be emphasised that learning another’s culture does not imply abandoning one’s own. Instead, it enriches the person with knowledge and empathy which is the need of the hour. The state has been a victim of misunderstandings in the past which have translated into gory affairs. These misunderstandings spur from lack of cultural integration among the residents and a sense of apathy towards other groups. If for once, everyone displayed empathy and considered learning the language, values and ethos of the others (not for economic reasons) then culture, which has been presented as threatened and needing protection till now will actually protect the state from misadventures.

Yours etc.,

Ria Lamsal,

Via email

Unauthorised use of emergency horns

Editor,

Of late it is observed that many government vehicles (ML 01) and many other office/private vehicles use emergency horns viz., horns used in the escort vehicles, ambulances, etc, while they have to pass through crowded roads. This is highly illegal and should be cracked down by the Traffic Department, Meghalaya Police. Users of such horns should be arrested and penalized,  otherwise, they are fooling the public on the roads in Shillong.

Yours etc.,

Dr Shantanu Dutta

Shillong -3

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