Conundrum of opportunity

By Lawrence Pherliam Sumer

At present, we have three categories of people, the first are those that are convinced of the
existence of the virus, probably from witnessing close encounters with loved ones at home, the second type are the ones that are deeply embedded in the belief system of “a fake virus”, those that are settled that it is the outcome of a pre-planned concept known as the New World Order.

We are still in the midst of a very pressing pandemic, which only seems to be on the upsurge, if not in the country, but at least in some parts of the North Eastern states. Even as I write this, another “state lockdown” looks imminent. As common citizens, we are yet to understand the gravity of the situation we are in and God help the authorities who are in the “thick of the action” to ensure the message of protocols gets across distinctly. At present, we have three categories of people, the first are those that are convinced of the existence of the virus, probably from witnessing close encounters with loved ones at home, the second type are the ones that are deeply embedded in the belief system of “a fake virus”, those that are settled that it is the outcome of a pre-planned concept known as the New World Order and therefore are not to be easily persuaded and the last group are those that are “neither here nor there” but would choose to flow with the voice of the majority.
Nevertheless, whatever type of group we may identify ourselves with, we cannot deny the fact that we are all affected by whatever is going on at the moment and having attended twice the number of funerals during the last two years as much as I had attended in the last 20 years, I see three issues that this pandemic has brought about. A deep physical scar on many individuals that may take a long time to heal – the rude shock that comes from the sudden demise of our loved ones during these times has a far reaching effect and worse is the inability to say those “proper goodbyes”. Next is the relational scar that has affected our day to day relationship. We may have never witnessed the most damaging of debates before this, whether in print or digital media alike, with friends turning foes for the sake of standing by what they believe in, irrespective of being right or wrong. Of course, the financial scar, that has robbed every family that has to go through hospitalisation thereof and probably, the very reason, why many middle-class citizens would deter from going forward for testing. It does leave a huge hole in your pocket and for some it just wipes off their life’s earnings forever.
Let us also not forget the lasting impact that the environment we live in will have upon our children. Imagine, that phase of growing up in your life without any outings. Why would small children, without any fault of theirs have to go through an “indoor grind” day in day out? No friends to grow together with and more so having to go through the academic years with the so called “online classes” where half the time there is no proper network. We will not even mention the hardships that the “hand to mouth” population has to go through. If there is a phrase to describe the chaos that has set in right now, it is “we are all in limbo”. It is a “disaster” that will take a long time if we are to rebuild each one of those broken walls.
Longer indeed, but we still have to start the rebuilding process sooner than later. So, where do we fit in all of this? What is our part? Do we have a role to play? Yes, certainly! Irrespective of the three categories we may each belong to we can still contribute in the rebuilding process. Maybe, post the aftermath, it does present us with a great opportunity to come back stronger than we had ever been. We may start with “self-introspection”. We may not have been the reason for whatever is happening around us, but we may as well choose to become part of the solution, instead of remaining “a pout”. We may try to become more disciplined in the way we put across our ideas, something more “constructive” with words. Then we proceed to bring about a better “work culture” which will be a challenge for many, as they say “old habits die hard”, but trying to pursue something as noble as such is worth trying. One of the roots for Japan’s success after being totally wiped out after World War II, is the will to learn rigid rules of behaviour, such as the precisely choreographed submissive posture on how low to bow before each other. It is only as we learn to respect each other and one another’s opinions that we shall overcome. When we try to create a more “conducive environment” for everyone around us, we will foresee a great future ahead of us. If there is one good thing that this pandemic teaches us, it is this, “We either fall together not trying or we try building together as one.”

“A deep physical scar on many individuals that may take a long time to heal – the rude shock that comes from the sudden demise of our loved ones during these times has a far reaching effect and worse is the inability to say those “proper goodbyes”. Next is the relational scar that has affected our day to day relationship.”

(The writer can be contacted at [email protected])

Get real time updates directly on your device, subscribe now.

Comments are closed.