Why allow protests near Civil Hospital?

Editor,

The location of the statue of U Kiang Nangbah opposite Shillong Civil Hospital has now become the venue for dharnas, sit-in demonstrations, rallies, and hunger strike for groups of people demanding their rights from the government. Inspired by the life, courage, and sacrifice of the great Jaintia patriot, this place is popular for staging agitation programs by various pressure groups, teacher’s organisations, etc. However, I am appalled at seeing the staging of such programmes so near to the Civil Hospital, which is the most sought-after hospital for commoners. These dharnas/agitation programmes last for hours and vehicular movement is restricted or diverted. How do we expect patients to reach the hospital in emergencies? These demonstrations occasionally turn violent, like the one we witnessed on Thursday. They have the potential to disturb the patients and put their lives at stake.
It is understood that staging an agitational programme near the Meghalaya Secretariat cannot be allowed. But what is the justification for allowing these to be held in a location close to a hospital? Are the lives of innocent, poor patients mostly from rural areas less important in any way?

Yours etc.,

Dr Omarlin Kyndiah

via email

Spineless MDA Govt

Editor,

The recent incident in the border village of Mukroh where five Jaintia tribesmen of Meghalaya lost their lives also points out to the state of misery within the political establishments here in Meghalaya. The Government of Assam led by its able and dynamic CM, Himanta Biswa Sarma spared no time in suspending the police and forest officials besides retransferring the SP. The Assam Government has also handed over the matter for judicial and CBI inquiry besides ordering framing of SOPs for the Home and Forest departments. Mind you, all these decisions and actions have been taken by the Assam CM camping in New Delhi. On the other hand, if we look at Meghalaya and the several incidents in the past when violence led to loss of lives, the only words we have been hearing since time immemorial are, “We will look into the matter; we are taking stock of the situation.” Such preposterous statements from our CMs past and present indicates the lack of will to catch the bull by its horn and their utter state of helplessness. The political leaders of Meghalaya should take a leaf out of the Assam CM’s book and shed their dependency syndrome and their tendency to look towards New Delhi for solving every problem. Let us hope that Meghalaya is relieved from the tonic called NPP after the next assembly election. Let us hope that we will see an analeptic change early 2023, whether it be TMC, BJP or any other party. And I hope to be able to write in these columns of this daily, next year, that the disastrous CM, Conrad K. Sangma is ultimately gone for good.

Yours etc.

BC Paul

Shillong – 4

Tit for tat won’t work

Editor,

Not allowing the Assam vehicles to come to Shillong and beyond and vice versa is creating a lot of trouble for people travelling to Guwahati airport or railway station. How was the situation allowed to develop to this point? Who first stopped the Assam vehicles from entering Meghalaya? Now things have reached a flashpoint where even petrol tankers don’t want to enter Meghalaya or might enter with police patrol. How can two neighbouring states with common borders behave like little kids? And may we ask what the police force is for if not to ensure that no one takes advantage of the situation? This tit for tat policy is good among equals but Meghalaya is a dependent state. If Assam decides to block all the trucks carrying essential goods and the Central Government does not intervene quickly enough Meghalaya will run out of essential commodities. The pressure groups don’t seem to have the IQ to understand this dependency.

Yours etc.,

PK Nongrum,

Via email

Neglected Jal Jeevan Mission Project

Editor,

In my village of Seelpang, Rongara the Jal Jeevan Mission project was given to a contractor named Didimony N. Marak who has now abandoned the project without completing it. She has built only the water tank and no pipeline was laid. The tank has now dried up and cracked. The villagers are facing severe water crisis as a result of the heavy rainfall and landslide in the month of June which damaged the existing pipelines. This new project will help to solve the water crisis faced by the villagers if it is properly built and completed. The villagers have submitted a complaint letter to the Deputy Commissioner on November 9 but till date no action has been taken and nor has the work on the project been resumed. But this is not the story of my village alone. There are other six villages nearby where the Jal Jeevan Mission project is incomplete. I request the concerned authorities to take urgent steps to complete the project at the earliest.

Yours etc.,

Mangrak M. Marak

Village: Seelpang Rongara, South Garo Hills

Two big upsets in 2022 WC

Editor,

The ongoing Football World cup which is less than 1 week old has so far sprung two big upsets. For a competition that’s usually won by global heavyweights, this World Cup is still the place for shocks. Saudi Arabia delivered a sucker punch to Argentina 2-1 and Japan stunned Germany with late strikes. It has really been an unpredictable start to this latest edition of the World Cup.

Yours etc

M.Haque,

Shillong-6

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