6 in 10 Indian workers suffering from pandemic-led imposter syndrome

New Delhi, Jan 18 : After going through two stressful years of the Covid-19 pandemic, more than 7 in 10 (71 per cent) of professionals questioned their abilities at work more now than before the pandemic while 63 per cent said they suffer from ‘imposter syndrome’, a new LinkedIn report showed on Tuesday.

The ‘impostor syndrome’ is a psychological pattern in which an individual doubts his/her skills, talents or accomplishments.

According to the report, the self-doubt seems to be a byproduct of working in isolation for nearly two years as 33 per cent of professionals say the pandemic has negatively impacted their confidence at work.

The findings showed that lack of face-to-face support from supervisors and peers (40 per cent), having to take on new responsibilities (34 per cent), and having to use more technology (31 per cent) are the top three work stressors for professionals in India.

Amid the stress, more than 8 in 10 Indian professionals are considering a job change this year and flexible working arrangements are their top-most priority.

The report said that the job reshuffle in India is being led by freshers with up to one year of work experience (94 per cent) and Gen Z professionals (87 per cent), who are more likely to consider changing jobs in 2022.

The professionals are leaving their current jobs due to poor work-life balance (30 per cent), not enough money (28 per cent), or greater career ambitions (23 per cent).

The report said that professionals in India are confident about their job roles (45 per cent), careers (45 per cent) and overall job availability (38 per cent) getting better in 2022.

“In fact, 86 per cent of professionals in India say they are confident about the strength of their professional networks as they enter into the new year looking for new job opportunities,” the findings showed.

The top reasons that can convince professionals in India to stay with their current employer in 2022 include better salary (42 per cent), more appreciation (36 per cent), and improved work-life balance (34 per cent).

“The findings also indicate a glaring disparity in the perception of men and women towards how they are being compensated by their current employers today,” the report mentioned.

Working women (37 per cent) are 1.3 times more likely to quit their current job due to poor work-life balance, when compared to working men (28 per cent).

They are also more likely (49 per cent) to say they will remain with their current employer if they get better pay, when compared to working men (39 per cent).

“This may be a wake up call for employers to revisit their compensation benefits and ensure more inclusivity through their offerings,a the LinkedIn report said. (IANS)

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